Remembrance Day commemorations forge ahead

November 19, 2020 BY

Veteran Cec Browning attended the service. Photo: PETER THOMAS

AT THE eleventh hour of the eleventh month, RSL President Bob Tyler and a small band of veterans from all conflicts since World War Two gathered in wind and rain at Point Danger.

Sadly, the Remembrance Day commemorations arrived before COVID restrictions allowed more than 10 attendees. Councilor elect Paul Barker, a former RAAF serviceman attended the service.

A statement from the Torquay RSL acknowledged that Remembrance Day represents lives lost during any conflict or from mental or physical wounds brough home from any deployment.

Following the ceremony after wreaths had been laid, members were able to pay their individual respects.

Cec Browning, a World War Two veteran featured on the commemorative Gilbert Street banners, who has not missed a Remembrance or ANZAC Day commemoration since returning from service in the Royal Australian Navy, was able to attend.

RSL Wellbeing Advocate Peter Thomas said the day was still incredibly special despite the unconventional and ultimately disappointing proceedings.

“A lot of war widows and older veterans couldn’t attend and have that moment of respect and commemoration,” he said.

“I know of people who remembered in their homes and aged care facilities ran their own ceremonies. They have a number of ex-service people.”

“We had 10 official guests, but others turned up regardless but stood back.”

“Three members of the Vietnam Veterans motorcycle Club came from Geelong and a few locals who were scattered around the Point
Danger memorials.”

A statement from the Torquay RSL acknowledged that Remembrance Day has come to represent not just the end of World War One, but all lost their lives during conflict or from mental or physical wounds brought home from any deployment.

Following the ceremony after wreaths had been laid, members were able to pay their
individual respects.

The RSL will now focus its attention on ANZAC day which did not go ahead in 2020.

“This year we had individual ceremonies out the front of people’s houses which was beautiful. We are really hoping will be able to have one in 2021, but that is still uncertain.”

Fundraising efforts for ANZAC day commemorations will begin at the end of December.